Famous Scientists “Wanted Poster” Using Google Draw

Wanted Poster Sample- Jacques Cousteau.jpg
Sample Wanted Poster

This is one of my favorite projects of the year and using Google Draw allowed the students to work on it both in class and at home. In the past, we used a software program to design the posters, but it had a lot of restrictions as to when and where they could work on their posters. By using Google Draw, students were also able to share their posters with me and I could proofread it much more easily and offer suggestions.

We hold a scientist ‘draft pick’ when making our selections. Students come up with a list of their ‘top 10’ scientists and each student draws a number. I select a number randomly and whoever has that number gets to choose first. Once a scientist has been chosen, no one else is allowed to pick that person. Sometimes students choose to spin the “Wheel of Science” when they are not sure who to pick and will allow the wheel to pick for them.

Basic Requirements:

  1. Google Draw to design your poster – Print in color on 8 ½ x 11 paper
  2. First, middle, and last name of your scientist
  3. Picture of your scientist
  4. His/her birthday (Month, Day, Year if available)
  5. ONE sentence of why they are famous or “wanted”  
    • This sentence has to be approved
  6. Country he/she was born in
  7. Where he/she did their work – was it at their home, at a school, a lab, etc
  8. Date of death or current age if living today
  9. Summarize His/Her accomplishments in your own words:
    • One paragraph using 3 – 5 complete sentences
  10. Your name in the bottom RIGHT corner of your poster
  11. List of your sources used for information, pictures, etc on a separate Google Doc.

Choose up to 4 of the following requirements to add to your poster:

  1. A quote by your scientist
  2. 1 – 2 additional pictures of your scientist
  3. A picture of what they worked on
  4. Where they went to school/college
  5. If they had any other jobs
  6. Family information: husband/wife, children, parents, brothers, sisters
  7. What else was happening in history when this scientist was famous
  8. Did this scientist work with another scientist?
    • Who was it and what did they do?
  9. Are there any museums or other places that are named after your scientist? Where is it?

Added 12/26/16: I first posted this lesson in 2000 (as Liz Belasic) here is a version from 2002 with  additional details

NGSS Middle School (6–8) Evidence Statements

NGSS has released the Evidence Statements for Middle School Science – (link)

In the table below, links for each standard will take you directly to their website and documents.

Physical Sciences                                                                   

   Life Sciences                                                               

    

    Earth and Space               Sciences                                           

 Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science
     Full PS PDF       Full LS PDF        Full ESS PDF        Full ETS1 PDF
     Full PS1 PDF      Full LS1 PDF       Full ESS1 PDF        MS-ETS1-1
       MS-PS1-1       MS-LS1-1        MS-ESS1-1       MS-ETS1-2
       MS-PS1-2       MS-LS1-2        MS-ESS1-2       MS-ETS1-3
       MS-PS1-3       MS-LS1-3        MS-ESS1-3       MS-ETS1-4
       MS-PS1-4       MS-LS1-4        MS-ESS1-4
       MS-PS1-5       MS-LS1-5      Full ESS2 PDF
       MS-PS1-6       MS-LS1-6        MS-ESS2-1
     Full PS2 PDF       MS-LS1-7        MS-ESS2-2
       MS-PS2-1       MS-LS1-8        MS-ESS2-3
       MS-PS2-2    Full LS2 PDF        MS-ESS2-4
       MS-PS2-3       MS-LS2-1        MS-ESS2-5
       MS-PS2-4       MS-LS2-2        MS-ESS2-6
       MS-PS2-5       MS-LS2-3      Full ESS3 PDF
     Full PS3 PDF       MS-LS2-4        MS-ESS3-1
       MS-PS3-1       MS-LS2-5        MS-ESS3-2
       MS-PS3-2    Full LS3 PDF        MS-ESS3-3
       MS-PS3-3       MS-LS3-1        MS-ESS3-4
       MS-PS3-4       MS-LS3-2        MS-ESS3-5
       MS-PS3-5    Full LS4 PDF
    Full PS4 PDF       MS-LS4-1
       MS-PS4-1       MS-LS4-2
       MS-PS4-2       MS-LS4-3
       MS-PS4-3       MS-LS4-4
      MS-LS4-5
      MS-LS4-6

NASA Spinoffs Interactive Website

NASA Spinoffs Interactive Website
NASA Spinoffs Interactive Website

NASA has a great interactive website for students to explore how technologies developed for space exploration are used to improve our daily lives. I made a handout to help guide the students through the website and learn more about items that they used or found interesting. Using their handout, they listed and compared how NASA used or developed the technology to how we use the technology.

  • NASA Spinoffs handout (pdf) and (link)