Comparing Mitosis & Meiosis Resources

meiosis-vs-mitosis-gif.gifIntro to Meiosis with a comparison to Mitosis

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Amoeba Sisters Videos:

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Parts of the Cell: Using the Jigsaw Method to learn about Organelles

Updated October 2018 – Instead  of doing this as a jigsaw activity, each group comes up with an analogy for each cell organelle based on their chosen theme. Each group then presents their theme and analogies to the class. Below are some sample slides for one group’s theme which was our school:

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This is an updated version on how to use the ‘Jigsaw Method’ for students to learn about cell organelles that includes a tech component –  each expert group will create Power Point slides for their assigned organelles. When each expert group is done, they will have one complete set of slides that they will use to teach each other in their home groups, use as a resource to review at home, and/or print out flashcards (4-6 slides per page) if needed.

Materials

  • Desktop/Laptop/Tablet with Internet Access
  • Google Slides Template (public link)
    • One shared google doc per home group
    • To save this ppt – click on “File” then “Make a Copy” or “Download as” and choose the format you would like. Please do not request editing access to this file – that would change my version of this slide show.
  • Worksheet for 4 expert groups (pdf)
  • Worksheet for 5 expert groups (pdf)
    • this allows for less information per expert group, but larger home groups

Links for research 

  1. BrainPOP Cell Video (free link)
  2. BrainPOP Cell Structures Video (link)
  3. Biology 4 Kids – Cell Structure (link)
  4. Cells Alive (link)
  5. Harcourt School (link)
  6. Khan Academy Video (link)
  7. I Know That (link)
  8. Plant cell Video (link)

Group 1 contains an expert from A, B, C, & D. All of the “A” members will sit together to research their assigned organelles. Each member of group A will research and create their own slides for the Nucleus (slide 2), Nucleolus (slide 3), Chromatin (slide 4), and Centrioles (slide 5). Home group members (B, C, & D) will add their information to the rest of the slides at the same time A is adding information from the A expert group.

On each slide, they will include the following information:

  • Name of organelle
  • Location (Nucleus or Cytoplasm?)
  • Plant, Animal, or Both?
  • Function
  • Images of the organelle
  • Image of an analogy for that organelle

Encourage students to use the animation feature to have the information appear sequentially instead of seeing all the information as soon as they advance to the next slide. This will help with note taking when they are presenting their information to their home group.

After each expert group is done with their research, they will return to their home group. The member from group A will go first, and using presentation mode in Google Slides (via desktop/laptop/tablet) they will teach their home group about the nucleus, nucleolus, chromatin, and centrioles. Members B, C, and D will write their notes on the handout provided. When A is done, the member from expert group B (via desktop/laptop/tablet) will present his/her organelles in the same manner.

If possible, having each student use their own laptop or desktop for the research phase (expert groups) and then only one laptop or tablet for the presentation part (home group) would be the best option so that their focus is on the person who is presenting.

Additional Resources

  • Cells Worksheet (ScienceSpot link)
  • Animal Cell Coloring (link)
  • Plant Cell Coloring (link)
  • For more information on how to use the Jigsaw Method – (link)

Blood Types Flashcards & Games

I used this hands-on activity as a review/reinforcement with my 7th graders and it really helped them understand the different blood types, about blood donation, and basic Punnett Squares. Plus they had fun playing the games and making up their own games.

Materials:

  • One set of laminated flashcards (pdf) per person, or two sets shared in a group of 4 students
  • pencil and lined paper to make Punnett Squares

All of the instructions and different games to play are explained in the handout. Some examples are: Who can donate? Punnett Square Practice, Identification, Memory, and Matching.

Other ways to use the cards:

  • Flashcards –  Students can print their own at home and use them to study
  • You can set up a station/rotation to play the games as they are, or as ‘make your own’ game stations. Or a combination of both. Place one game at each station and have the students rotate every 7-10 minutes (see below for logistics)
  • Rotation Directions – students will rotate from table to table and learn to play the game at each station
    • Need a group of 4 students at each station.
    • When it is time to rotate, only 2 go to the next station, and 2 stay.
    • The 2 that stay are the experts on that game.
    • The 2 experts teach the 2 novices how to play when they rotate to the table.
    • When it is time to rotate, the 2 experts who stayed go to the next group, and the novices are now the experts and teach the 2 new novices that came to the station.
  • Quiz-Quiz Trade
    • give each student a RBC card and have them identify it, then trade
    • give each student a blood-type card and ask for the genotype (ie AA or AO)
    • Or mix both decks and play both games
  • Find your Partner
    • give half or your class Blood Type Cards and the other half of the class RBC cards and have them find the matching set

Interactive Links for further practice

  • Blood Typing Game – can you make the right choice? (link)
  • Are you my blood type? can you find the donor? (link)
  • Emergency Room – figure out the blood type and correct transfusion (link)
  • NatGeo – interactive heart (link)
  • BrainPOP:  Blood & Blood Pressure

If you use this lesson in your classroom, I am always happy to hear how it went!

For related lesson plans, please visit my Life Science page.