‘Alien Juice Bar’ – Cabbage Juice and pH Values

Screen Shot 2015-03-05 at 11.29.30 AM

This classic interactive website is a great way to practice identifying acidic, basic, and neutral substances along with reading pH values. There are three different levels which increase in difficulty as the students complete each activity.

Challenge 1 – students have to identify and categorize the different ‘juices’ that they will serve to the aliens as either Acids, Bases, or Neutral.

Challenge 2 – students will practice serving requested juices to aliens, but if they serve a juice from the wrong category, aliens can become sick, or worse!

Challenge 3 – students have to change the pH values of the juices on the tray by either adding acids or bases to raise or lower the pH values.

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Solid, Liquid, & Gas – Triple Venn Diagram Activity

Solid, Liquid, & Gas- Phases & Changes Venn Diagram Sorting Activity (Public)

Updated Dec. 2018

I added a 16th term to the Venn Diagram and new handout to go with it.

Materials:

  • Google Slides (Public) – this slide presentation will show the answers for the activity
  • Handouts: (PDF) Includes blank venn diagram, slips to cut apart, and answer key
  • Optional Videos:
  • Statements: Different ways to use the 16 statements, or facts, about Solids, Liquids, and Gases:
    • give each group 2-4 facts to discuss and place into the Venn Diagram
    • give each group all 16 facts to discuss, then ask each group to place one fact into the diagram
      • this is the versions I use, see below for details
    • give each student or pair of students only 1 fact
    • give every student all 16 facts and have them glue it into their Venn diagram
    • give every student all 16 facts and have them ‘dry fit’ the statements then handwrite them into their Venn diagrams (you can laminate and reuse the statements for each class) (I prefer to have the students write the facts into their Venn diagrams.)

How to use this version of the activity:

Whole class activity

  1. Discuss what we know about Solids, Liquids, and Gases.
  2. Give each student one of the 16 facts. They are not to share their facts with the class until it was their turn to present.
  3. They may or may not know the answer to their fact, and we discussed this first. I told them I would give them clues if they needed help and not to worry too  much about getting the answer ‘wrong’.
  4. After a minute or so to think about it, ask the person with Fact #1 to stand and read their fact to the class. The rest of class will think about the fact and where it might go into the Venn Diagram, but not share their answers.
  5. The person with Fact #1 will guess where the fact fit into the Venn Diagram. Once they give the correct answer, click on the Google Slide and the answer will pop up on the screen.
  6. Everyone will write fact #1 into their notes.
    • Optional:
      • Using a blue colored pen or pencil, the students will fill in the phrases related to the states of matter and their characteristics, such as definite shape or volume.
      • Using a red colored pen or pencil, they can write in the phase changes, such as evaporation. They will notice that all of the phase changes are placed where two states of matter overlap.
        • For example, evaporation is placed where liquids and gases overlap.
  7. Then ask the person with Fact #2 to read their fact to the class, and so on until all 15 facts are posted.
  8. We would discuss each fact and any questions they might have.
  9. If you have more than 16 students, you can have them work with a partner and guess together.

Cooperative Groups

  1. Instead of each student having only one fact, you can have the class work in cooperative groups and give one set of the 16 facts to a group of 4 students.
  2. The students will discuss/share their facts within their group and come to an agreement on where it should go.
  3. They will place the facts on top of the Venn Diagram where they think it is the best fit.
  4. Once each group has had a chance to discuss their facts, you can go over the answers as a class.
  5. Starting with #1, have the first group tell the class where they think it belongs in the Venn diagram and why.
  6. If their answer is correct, show the answer in the Venn diagram and have each student write that fact into their notes.
    • Optional: Using a blue colored pen or pencil, the students will fill in the phrases related to the states of matter and their characteristics, such as definite shape or volume.
    • Using a red colored pen or pencil, they can write in the phase changes, such as evaporation. They will notice that all of the phase changes are placed where two states of matter overlap.For example, evaporation is placed where liquids and gases overlap.
  7. If it in incorrect, go to the next group and have them share where they think it belongs.
  8. Ask the next group for fact #2, and repeat the steps above until all 16 facts have been placed into the Venn diagram and each group has had a chance to place a fact into the Venn Diagram.

Independent Seat Work, or as part of a Station/Center/Review

  1. You can also do this activity where each student will cut out all 16 facts and work independently to figure out where each fact would go in the Venn Diagram. They will then write in the facts as each answer is discussed.
  2. As a station/center activity/review, you can have a blank laminated Venn Diagram, a laminated answer key, and laminated facts. Students can guess where each fact goes into the diagram, then check their work with the answer key and write the answers into their worksheet

Older Version:

solid_liquid_gas_triple_venn_diagram
Phases of Matter Venn Diagram

This is an interactive/SmartBoard activity to show the relationship between the phases of matter and phase change.

Materials:

Part 1 – Discussion and Categorizing: Students will work in collaborative groups to determine where each statement will go into the Venn diagram. In their notes, they will pencil in an ‘S’ for solid, ‘L’ for liquid, ‘SL’ if it goes between Solid/Liquid, etc… next to each statement on their list.

Part 2 – SMART Board: Each group will have a turn to make a guess to place one of the statements into the Venn diagram. If the group is correct, it stays in the Venn diagram and each student writes the statement into their Venn diagram handout and crosses it off the list. If the statement is incorrectly placed into the diagram, the statement is returned to the list outside of the diagram. The next group chooses a statement, and so on, until all of the statements have been placed correctly into the Venn diagram.

Using a blue colored pencil, the students will fill in the phrases related to the states of matter and their characteristics, such as definite shape or volume. Using a red colored pencil, they can write in the phase changes, such as evaporation. They will notice that all of the phase changes are placed where two states of matter overlap. For example, evaporation is placed where liquids and gases overlap.

For more lessons about phases of matter, please see my Properties of Matter page. Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MSScienceBlog

Moon Phases – Flip book, Birthday, and Matching Activities

Moon Phases Sort
Moon Phases Sort

Materials

  • Moon Phase Finder Template – glue onto paper plate, cut out center
  • Birthday Moons – this is a classic lesson that has I have used over the years. I made a Birthday Moon Phases worksheet (pdf) for my students to use based on the original lesson (as of Aug. 6, 2018 – the original lesson is no longer posted on their website). We did this activity prior to the phases sort above.
  • The Old Farmer’s Almanac for Kids (link)
    • At the bottom of the page, you can select the year and month to view the phases for the month/year you were born

Lesson Information

As part of our study about the moon, we have been observing the moon and practicing moon phase identification. For the activity pictured above, students were given a moon phase finder, and laminated cards containing images of the phases of the moon, descriptions of phases, and the names of the phases. The handout included matching the names of phases and their descriptions and the template to create the moon phases flip book. Instead of stapling the flip book when done, we used a rubber band to secure one end.

For the lesson, I started with a demonstration/explanation. Students would sort and match the cards first and then call me over to verify the phases when they were done. They self checked the descriptions by using the matching worksheet. I posted an answer key in the front of the room where they verified their answers/made corrections. Next, they used the cards to help them identify the 29 phases of the flip book. When done, they self check the phases with my answer key in the front of the room. Afterwards, they cut and assembled the flip book. I had small plastic bags and rubber bands for them to take home their pieces if they did not finish during the class period.

Additional Resources

  • I use the phrase “Wax on, Wane off” to practice identification. When the moon is waxing, the right side is getting brighter/larger, when it is waning, the left side is getting smaller/dimmer. (From where we are in the Northern Hemisphere)
    • Also: “Light-Left-Last-Quarter” to help differentiate between First and Third/Last Quarter Phases

For related lesson plans, please visit my Earth Science page.